Review: All-American Cowboy

Dylann Crush is a new-to-me author and I have to say, I really enjoyed this book. I don’t typically gravitate towards “western” or cowboy romances, but I liked the look of this one, so I gave it a shot. And I’m glad I did!

All-American Cowboy is a fantastic fish-out-of-water romance novel. Beck, or Beckett Sullivan Holiday III, is in the lineage of the founders of Holiday, TX, a little podunk town that appears to be somewhat close to Hill Country (a region of Texas around Austin, San Antonio, and San Marcos, the latter of which is mentioned as the nearest city) that gets its income from the “oldest honky tonk in Texas”, the Rambling Rose. (Apparently, the actual oldest honky tonk is in Gruene — pronounced Green — and seems to have a similar charm.)  Continue reading

Review: Do Over

The hardest reviews to write are for books that we just kind of meh. I didn’t like the structure of this book, so that really made it go downhill for me. There is a lot to commend it for, the characters seem to be pretty fleshed out, which doesn’t always happen. But the entire back-and-forth non-linear structure really didn’t work for this book.

We start with Jack (although we don’t find out his name for like two chapters or something, and it’s really weird, and at one point, his son is accidentally referred to as Jack instead of Gabe, and that really threw me), who works construction with his two buddies, who are given just enough backstory for me to know they will be getting their own novels later. Jack is watching his son on a weekend that’s not his usual weekend, because his son’s mother has a work thing. I have to admit from the lackluster way that he refers to the baby mama, I had no idea that we were getting a romance between the two of them until the next chapter, which is through her POV (that’s the magic way to know, I guess).  Continue reading

Review: Speakeasy

I gorged myself on Sarina Bowen’s True North series. I started with Bittersweet and gobbled them up like I was afraid I would starve without them. I shouldn’t have been surprised, I loved her Brooklyn Bruisers series, but for some reason, a small-town series set in rural Vermont wasn’t grabbing me. It wasn’t until Audible sponsored a group listen on Bittersweet that I figured I’d go ahead and start, and then I was hooked. (Never mind that I never figured out how to join in the group discussion, I inhaled those books.)

Speakeasy is the 5th book in the series. We get even more acquainted with May, who is Griffin Shipley’s (hero of book 1) little sister, Jude’s (hero of book 2) ride to Narcotics Anonymous, but we also learn more about Alec, who is Zara’s older brother (heroine of book 4). May and Alec both have reputations in their family of being the screw-up. That bumbling person that keeps messing up. (And while I feel like that title is quasi-deserved by Alec, May is rocking it and it’s mostly her low-self-esteem talking.) We learn in book 3 that May is an alcoholic, and that she’s been in love with her female best friend forever, but unfortunately for May, Lark is straight and also in love with a man. Book 4 shows us that May is moving on; she is in a committed relationship with another woman and seems to mostly have her feelings and her addiction under control.  Continue reading

Review: The One You Can’t Forget

Stories about school shootings are sadly never not relevant. In fact, the premise behind the tragedy that is the backdrop for the second installment in this series by Roni Loren is scarily prescient. I began reading this book the day of the Santa Fe shooting in Texas, trying to grapple with my own feelings about being so close to this latest preventable tragedy. The motive behind the fictional and the real murders appear to be unimaginably similar.

This book is barely about the shooting, however, and that’s how it should be. Tragedy shapes lives, but it doesn’t define them. Rebecca has to deal with a lot of the guilt that she has carried throughout the years, not only of being one of the few survivors, but also of her role in being the supposed inciting incident of one of the gunmen. There’s a lot to unpack here, which Loren doesn’t really spend much time on, but would make excellent discussion for a book group. Rebecca’s big secret shapes most of her life. She focuses on her career, trying to be the perfect daughter and career woman, taking pride in her efficient mask of productivity. The only problem is that she’s completely removed passion from her life in an effort to atone for past mistakes.

Wes Garrett has his own demons that he’s running from, but they are slightly less dramatic. After a series of poor choices, he’s now broke, teaching cooking classes at an alternative school for troubled youth. He was on the cusp of opening a fancy restaurant, having his photo in all the high end trade magazines, when a divorce completely knocked him off his feet, leading him to drown his sorrows in alcohol abuse. The catch is that the lawyer that represented his ex-wife is none other than Rebecca.

The romance between them goes in fits and starts, with both of them immediately recognizing their attraction to each other but trying to ignore it, while they are continually shoved into situations together out of coincidence. There’s great tension between them, from the agreement to be “friends who kiss” to the eventual “casual hook up” that turns into anything but.

Throughout the book, Wes has to deal with his tendency to run and hide in a bottle, and Rebecca has to come to terms with her PTSD and guilt over the shooting that occurred over a decade before. It all comes to a head with both of them having to set their fears aside in order to help a troubled kid.

If you are looking for tragedy porn here, look away. This book is not going to get into all of the whys and hows of school shootings, or any mass gun violence. This book focuses on the people who survive. And that’s where our attention should be.

free copy courtesy of NetGalley for review

Review: Brooklynaire

tl;dr: Exactly what I’ve come to expect from Sarina Bowen!

The Story:

Fans of Sarina Bowen’s Brooklyn Bruisers series have been waiting for this one since book one. Nate and Becca are well drawn characters from the beginning, and we get just enough of their story starting at the beginning to make it a tantalizing treat when we finally get to their story. In fact, the events of Brooklynaire and Pipe Dreams pretty much are concurrent.

Brooklynaire does go back in time a little bit, to when Nate’s company first starts, and gives a little backstory on why exactly he chooses to buy a hockey team. Of course, there’s a jilted ex-lover who hooks up with a hockey player, and of course there’s a showdown between his team and the team that guy plays for.

Technical Elements:

Overall, I loved this book. It was great seeing exactly what happened between Nate and Becca is the glimpses we got from the other books, and how exactly their relationship started. I felt like there had been slightly too much of a break in between when I read Pipe Dreams and this one, and so I kept wondering what connections I was missing since I’d forgotten some of that. Also, the conflict is a little shaky, and seems like Becca just doesn’t want to pursue a relationship for reasons, and Nate is unsure for other reasons.

Final Thoughts:

This book has the same amount of spice and humor that all the others of the Brooklyn Bruisers series have. I felt like the build up to the book made for a bit of let down, but that’s probably due to my inflated expectations. It was still a great book, and I recommend it highly.


Find a copy at your local library!

A free copy was provided by the author in exchange for an honest review.

Review: Easy Bake Lovin’

Georgia owns her own bakery, one that specializes in risque treats in the shape of certain anatomical areas, as a way to separate her life from her stuffy political family. Mike is just trying to get through the days since his ex-wife decided she didn’t want to be a mother anymore. When Mike goes to set up a security system in her bakery, the attraction is palpable. They quickly embark on a secret affair, and Mike is reluctant to bring her into his real life since he feels like he has to protect his kids.

Overall, this book was fairly enjoyable. The stakes are low and the whole thing is sorted out very quickly. It’s a short read. The most interesting part comes at the very end, when Mike’s sister comes back into town, bringing havoc and chaos with her. I imagine we’ll see more of her in the next book because she is also the ex of Mike’s co-worker, James. However, that little plot point had next to nothing to do with Mike and Georgia, except a tiny but of conflict where he admits something and his sister runs with it in an evil, kind of bitchy, way.

I did feel like this book had too much going on and not very much substance. There is a lot of plot, but most of it goes nowhere. Georgia’s high-powered and influential family is sort of an obstacle but not really. Mike’s kids are kind of making him reluctant, but not really.

It’s a cute, spunky story. I think it would make a great romantic comedy, but it was a little light on substance for a novel.

Review: Sit, Stay, Love

Kelsey is the lead adoption coordinator for High Grove Animal Shelter, and is feeling like she’s at a crossroads in her life. She left college abruptly after a humiliating post-coital rejection from her best male friend that sent her into a major depressive episode, but has been more or less content with her job. Her boss, Megan (who’s story was in the first book), has noticed her unease and a major project has fallen into her lap, and she eagerly assigns Kelsey to the task. What is the project, you ask? Rehabbing dozens of dogs who were in a cruel fighting ring.

Of course, Kelsey can’t do this alone, and ex-Marine Kurt ends up stepping in to help after an unfortunate meeting at the warehouse where the dogs are being temporarily held. (Yep, she barfs all over his shoes after being completely unprepared to see the injuries these poor pups have.) Kurt is just as reluctant to be rehabbed post-military as some of the dogs, but Kelsey’s calm nature and the old mansion that becomes the dog rehab headquarters begin to win him over.

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Review: Love Game

tl;dr: sexy banter but what is the hero thinking?!

The Story:

I read a lot of sports romances, but I’m not sure this one entirely counts as one. The hero and heroine are two coaches for teams that aren’t connected except for the university they both belong to, and the entire story takes place during the off-season of both sports. Kate coaches the women’s championship winning basketball team, and is a celebrated sports star in her own right, felled by an injury that led her to coaching at Wolcott. Danny has fallen from grace, a former coach for a high ranking college team who got caught in a recruitment scandal that cost him his job, his reputation, and his girlfriend, who jumped ship and married his younger brother.

Fresh off of Kate’s team’s latest championship win, she’s blindsided when she finds out that not only did the school hire a new football coach with a sordid past, but they also offered him double what they are paying her. She’s frustrated and angry, but she can’t deny the sparks that fly when she spars with her newest coworker. Her friend Millie, who also happens to be the publicist for the university, is egging on the rivalry because it gets lots of page views and clicks since it’s obvious that they have raging chemistry.

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Review: Barrelled Over

tl;dr: forgettable novel with too many characters and not enough heart

The Story:

Ava Grace Landy is a country superstar who rose to fame after winning a televised singing competition: essentially, she’s Carrie Underwood, although in this universe, she is competing with Ms Underwood for dollars and fans. Her new management team at her record label are threatening to kick her to the curb if she can’t reel in some male listeners, as apparently her entire fanbase is female.

In order to appease the directive, she decides to partner with her friend’s husband’s friend’s (phew!) bourbon distillery. It’s a unique boutique distillery, located in San Francisco rather than Kentucky, where most bourbon is made. Ava Grace decides rather quickly that she just has to have Beck, the guarded friend of her friend’s husband, who co-owns the distillery with two of his other friends (who no doubt have their own books complete with HEAs on the way).

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Review: Man Card

tl;dr: fun romantic romp with a dash of danger

The Story:

Picking up almost exactly where we left off from Man Hands, Man Card starts with Ash and Braht competing to sell Tom Spanner’s giant house. They are in full-on competition, with Ash deliberately trying to sabotage him. Instead of getting angry, however, Braht is just getting turned on by her feistiness. He’s cool and calm about her attempts to thwart him, and she’s becoming frustrated; and not just about the house.

Ash has demons in her past that make her think that Braht’s shiny, preppy exterior is an act, and she refuses to be pulled in. But more and more, she gets to see that he’s a genuine guy. And when her ex-husband, whom she helped put in prison, is granted parole, she becomes fearful. So who does she run to? A very delighted Braht.

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